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Tennis Elbow Injury Physiotherapy Treatment Clinic

Are you suffering from Tennis Elbow Injury Pain, then find the best Physical Therapy Exercises or Physiotherapy Treatment for Tennis Elbow Pain.

  • We can help you to recover fastly from your injury.
  • Fully equipped physiotherapy and rehabilitation clinic.
  • Appointments available 7.30 am – 8 pm & Monday-to-Saturday.

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What is Tennis Elbow?

Acute Tennis Elbow is an injury to the muscles that extend the wrist and fingers. The site of injury is typically the lateral epicondyle, a bony bump on the outside of the elbow where these muscles attach. Tennis Elbow symptoms that have lasted more than 6 weeks are considered to be sub-acute and beyond three months, as chronic tennis elbow.

Tennis Elbow Injury Signs and Symptoms –

  • Pain in the outer part of the elbow (lateral epicondyle)
  • Point tenderness over the lateral epicondyle-a prominent part of the bone on the outside of the elbow
  • Pain from gripping and movements of the wrist, especially wrist extension[citation needed] and lifting movements
  • Pain from activities that use the muscles that extend[citation needed] the wrist (e.g. pouring a container of liquid, lifting with the palm down, sweeping, especially where wrist movement is required)
  • Morning stiffness

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Tennis Elbow Injury Treatment

The first step is to rest your arm and avoid the activity that causes your symptoms for at least 2 – 3 weeks. You may also want to:

  • Put ice on the outside of your elbow 2 – 3 times a day.
  • Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen, naproxen, or aspirin).

If your tennis elbow is due to sports activity, you may want to:

  • Ask about any changes you can make to your technique.
  • Check any sports equipment you are using to see if any changes may help. If you play tennis, changing your grip size of the racket may help.
  • Think about how often you have been playing and whether you should cut back.

If your symptoms are related to working on a computer, ask your manager about making changes to your workstation or have someone look at how you chair, desk, and computer are set up. 
An occupational therapist can show you exercises to stretch and strengthen the muscles of your forearm.
You can buy a special brace for tennis elbow at most drug stores. It wraps around the upper part of your forearm and takes some of the pressure off the muscles.
Your doctor may also inject cortisone and a numbing medicine around the area where the tendon attaches to the bone. This may help decrease the swelling and pain.
If the pain continues after 6 – 12 months of rest and treatment, surgery may be recommended. Talk with your orthopedic surgeon about the risks, and whether surgery might help.